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Let Your Imagination Run Wireless with the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit: Your Idea Deserves a Prototype

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Automated homes, drones, interactive art installations– XBee can be found nearly anywhere. And, more and more devices are using XBee to connect to the cloud. Connecting a device to the Internet should be simple, that’s why we built the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit. XBee_Dev_Board_w_XBeeWith an XBee ZB module and an XBee Gateway, it’s easy to connect your robot, vehicle, sensors, or anything else to the Internet.

Maybe you want to build a mesh network to monitor the health of your garden or perhaps, you have a top secret idea for your business, but you’re unsure where to start. Here are a few examples to help familiarize yourself with the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit and go from idea to prototype and transform your imagination into reality:

3 Simple XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit Examples

Potentiometer
Potentiometer’s are ubiquitous when it comes to building with electronics and they make great starting point when familiarizing yourself with new technology. Here, we’ll connect this analog input to the cloud, so you can view the values on your Heroku-hosted dashboard. Potentiometers can be used for setting a level, determining an angle or just as a simple user interface adjustment. Nicknamed “pots,” these components are variable resistors. With a simple twist you can alter the amount of voltage that flows out through their center pin.

Push Button
Want to control the light in your room from where you’re sitting? If you answered yes, this example is a great place to start with the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit. Remote control of a button is perfect for projects that require user input, or anyplace you need to detect a change in device state. One you’ve built your circuit, you’ll be able to view the status of the button and control it from your web interface.photo (17)

Temperature 
Temperature monitoring is another great starting point with analog sensing. In this example we use everyone’s favorite temperature sensor, the TMP36 low-voltage linear sensor, which is included with your kit. After you’ve built this simple circuit, you can view the temperature on the dashboard.

Let’s Get Started
These are just a few ideas to get you thinking about what is possible with this new XBee kit. You can find all of these examples and more here, and check out the XBee Gallery to find what others have built with XBee.

Interested in getting an XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit? Head over here.

APAC IoT Conference: Turning the Internet of Things Conversation into Strategies of Today

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Screen Shot 2014-11-11 at 3.04.03 PM
We’d like to thank everyone that came out to our IoT Conference in Shenzhen last week. It was a great event filled with lots of fun, many interesting IoT related discussions, and even a table tennis competition (see pictures below). This was one of our largest partner conferences yet, with a total of more than 120 attendees from around APAC. Connecting with our partners around the globe is a valuable experience as it guides where we focus as a company.

We have tons of great pictures from the event that you can check out below.

 

Thanks again to everyone that was able to attend! Want to know which upcoming events you can find Digi? Check out our events page.

XBee Tech Tip: Connecting to the IoT with XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit

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This Tech Tip is brought to you by Digi Applications Engineer Mark Grierson, who will take you through the steps to connect an XBee Smart Plug to the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit and manage it from the XBeegateway.herokuapp.com web application.

The XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit is the easiest way to connect to the Internet of Things (IoT). It features a sample web application that lets users remotely activate various outputs on the development board including LEDs, a vibration motor, a bar graph gauge and an audio buzzer.

In addition, users can build their own circuits on the development board to sense temperature or light, switch on and off other devices via a relay, turn on and off additional LEDs and more. The web application code is open-source, available for anyone to download and use as a learning tool.

The purpose of this article is not to teach you how to set up and use the kit. There is an excellent online user’s guide that will step you through that process found here. http://ftp1.digi.com/support/documentation/html/90001399/90001399_A/Files/kit-getting-started.html

This article assumes that you have set up the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit and have followed the instructions in the getting started guide.

Using the XBee Smart Plug with the New XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit

Now that you have seen how easy it is to web enable just about any device, you may be wondering about Digi’s boxed ZigBee devices such as the XBee Smart Plug, XBee Sensors, AIO and DIO adapters, etc. Can you use these devices with the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit? Absolutely!

1)     Introduction

Using the XBee Smart Plug is an easy way to intelligently monitor and control connected electrical devices. This example uses the XBee Smart Plug and allows you to control the AC relay as well as read and monitor the AC current sensor, the Temperature Sensor and the Light Sensor.

The three sensors generate voltage outputs that are passed to the XBee’s analog-to-digital converter (ADC). These readings are then sent via Device Cloud to the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit’s online dashboard application where you can control and monitor the XBee Smart Plug right in your web browser.xbeegateway1-259x300

2)     Assemble the Parts

To complete this exercise you’ll need:

1 – XBee Gateway

1 – XBee Smart Plug

1 – Device Cloud Accountxbeegateway2-300x300

 

3)     Connect the XBee Smart Plug to the Gateway and Configure

You’ll need to ensure the XBee Smart Plug is connected to your XBee Gateway. If your XBee Smart Plug is new and has not connected to a ZigBee network, this should be as simple as plugging it in while the XBee Gateway is powered up.xbeegate3-201x300

The Green Association (ASSC) light will flash once the XBee Smart Plug has joined a network.

You can then go to the XBee Network tab in the configuration section of the Gateway’s web UI to ensure the smart plug has joined.

deviceconfic1

If the XBee Smart Plug does not show up, click on the “Discover XBee Devices” button to have the XBee Gateway perform a network discovery. If the XBee Smart Plug still does not show up and the ASSC light is flashing on the XBee Smart Plug, this means that the XBee Smart Plug has joined another ZigBee network and must be reset using a 4-button press of the Reset button. Consecutive button presses must occur within 800 milliseconds of each other for the reset to occur.

xbeegateway4

When the reset is successful, the ASSC light will go steady as the XBee Smart Plug looks for a new network to join and will flash again once it joins. Return to the Gateway web UI and click discover to see the XBee Smart Plug is now joined to the XBee Gateway.

Once the XBee Smart Plug has joined the XBee Gateway, configure it by clicking on the extended address of the Smart plug.

deviceconfig2

After a few seconds, the settings of the XBee Smart Plug will be displayed. Click on the Input/Output settings tab and:

  1. Check the Detect box for D4 (D4 is used to toggle the AC outlet)
  2. Ensure that the IR parameter is set to 5000ms
  3. Click the Apply button to save changes 

deviceconfig3

4) View It!

You will use the XBee Wi-Fi Cloud Kit’s web application to configure three widgets for viewing the temperature current and light readings from your sensor. You will also configure a widget to control the AC relay.

Log in to the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit web application: https://xbeegateway.herokuapp.com/#/login

dcscreen342

The Outlet Widget

First we will create the outlet control widget.

Use the Add Widget button to create a new display widget.

dcwidget

Choose On/Off Switch Widget for the widget type.

Add a label such as “XBee Smart Plug Outlet.”

Choose your XBee Gateway and module by selecting their ID.

Select DIO4 as the output stream and check the device configuration to make sure it is configured properly. Your screen should look like the following.

createnewwidget

Save the changes to see your new Widget on the home screen.

You should now be able to turn the XBee Smart Plug AC outlet on and off using the widget.

The Current Draw Meter Widget

Next we will createa widget to measure the current draw on the XBee Smart Plug. The concepts used to build this widget are the same for the light meter and temp sensor built into the XBee Smart Plug. Only the Input stream and transform will be different.

Use the Add Widget button to create a new display widget.

dcwidget

Choose Gauge Widget for the widget type.

Add a label such as “Current Draw.”

Choose your XBee Gateway and module by selecting their ID.

Select AD3 as the Input Stream and check the device configuration to make sure it is configured properly.

Enter the following formula into the Input Transform:

Enter “((((value/1024)*1200)*(156/47)-520)/180*0.7071)*1000″ into the Input Transform to transform the input from millivolts to milliamps. The formula in brackets converts the millivolt reading into AMPS. The herokuapp application is constrained to whole numbers and will convert a decimal result to the nearest whole number. To make this data more meaningful, we then multiply this value by 1000 to convert to milliamps. The following knowledgebase article is the source for this info: http://www.digi.com/support/kbase/kbaseresultdetl?id=3522#Adapters

Enter mA into the Units field.

Enter 0 for the Low value and 8000 into the High value (the XBee Smart Plug is only rated for loads up to 8 amps).

You screen should look like the following:

widgetsettings

Save the changes to see your new Widget on the home screen.

The Temperature and Light widgets are made using the same procedure as the Current widget with a few small changes.

For the Light Widget use the following:

Label=Light Meter

Input Stream=AD1

Input Transform=(value/1024) * 1200

Units=Lux

Low Value=0

High Value=1000

lightmeter

For the Temperature Widget use the following:

Label=Temperature

Input Stream=AD2

Input Transform= (((((value/1024)*1200)-500)/10)*1.8)+32 for Fahrenheit

= (((value/1024)*1200)-500)/10 for Celcius

Units=Fahrenheit or Celcius

Low Value=0

High Value=150

5) Use It!

Now you can use the XBee Smart Plug to control any AC appliance up to 8 Amps! Additionally, you can monitor the amperage being used along with the Ambient light and temperature around the XBee Smart Plug.

In my screenshot below, I have a 60 watt lamp connected to the XBee Smart Plug.

widget dashboard

Using a variation of Ohms law “P=VxI” we can see that this 60 watt bulb should draw about 500 milliamps at 120 volts. 60W/120V=.5Amps or 500 mA. My meter is showing 494 mA, which is just about right on! Feel free to try other widget types. Use a Bar Graph or Line Graph instead of a Gauge widget.

Now that you have completed this exercise, use what you have learned to add the XBee LTH Sensor, Wall Router or Analog Adapter.The formulas you will need for the transform can be found in this article: http://www.digi.com/support/kbase/kbaseresultdetl?id=3522#Adapters

This Week in the Internet of Things

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The Internet of Things is developing and buzzing all around us. Throughout the week we come across innovative projects, brilliant articles and posts that support and feature the innovators and companies that make our business possible. Here’s our list of favorites from this week’s journey on the Web.USWATERAUTO

Water Plants Embrace the Cloud | Automation World

Heat Seek NYC App Gives Brooklyn Tenants Ammo vs. Icy Apartments | NY Daily News

The Future of Cities: The Internet of Everything will Change How We Live | ForeignAffairs.com

A Guide for the Evaluation and Selection of Single Board Computers | All-Electronics

Forrester’s Top Emerging Technologies to Watch, Now Through 2020 | Forrester Blog

Please tell us in the comments below or Tweet us, @DigiDotCom- we would love to share your findings too. You can also follow all of the commentary and discussion with the hashtag #FridayFavorites.

Security Vulnerability – POODLE – CVE-2014-3566

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Overview

In the last few weeks, We have had a number of questions regarding the new vulnerability nicknamed “POODLE” CVE-2014-3566.”  As for every vulnerability, we review each one carefully to determine the impact to our devices and services, and we try to make a recommendation to our customers on the anticipated impact of these vulnerabilities. In these last weeks, we have conducted a risk analysis of this new vulnerability, as well as we are testing all of our devices for this vulnerability. Since this new vulnerability is coming down on the heels of HeartBleed and Shellshock, I am anticipating that many people will be covering this new vulnerability.

Analysis13334048894_001d3e53d1_z

In our testing, we have found that many of our devices are impacted. This is in part because of the backward compatibility that we have built within our products. However, we have determined that very few customers are using these features, and we are actively removing the SSLv3 support for new firmware versions going forward. We have already fixed this issue in a number of devices, and we are in the middle of releasing new versions of firmware with this issue fixed.

Impact

As for every vulnerability, we review each one carefully to determine the impact to our devices and services, and we try to make a recommendation to our customers on the anticipated impact of these vulnerabilities. However, since we do not know each specific configuration and data that our customers are using for our products and services, it is always suggested that the customer review their unique situation and understand what the risk could be to their environment. However, we have found that with our products, that we rate this a “very low” impact.

Notice

Please check the official Digi and Etherios corporate response to poodle at http://www.digi.com/support/kbase/kbaseresultdetl?id=3619

 

As always, if you have any questions, feel free to email cloud.security@etherios.com, or security@digi.com

Look What I Made: XBee Project Updates

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We are always finding amazing XBee projects. From robots, to rockets, to gardens–the creativity of XBee makers is endless. We have some new additions to the XBee Project Gallery and wanted to share them with you.  Let us know your favorite!

XBeeGallery

Wireless Firework Control System
It’s safe to say this is the most explosive project in the gallery. This wireless system allows you to control the launching of fireworks from a control unit that has 200 channels.

CanSat Solar Powered Data Collection
A team of student engineers from Guatemala needed a way to send data between a flying a rocket and a base station located on the ground. The rocket contained a payload, which collects sensor data as it falls back to the ground. What makes this project truly amazing is the fact that the whole system is solar powered!

Animatronic Ironman Suit
Yes, someone has made a full-scale replica of Ironman. No, it does not fly. You can find XBee inside the suit’s helmet. Wiring was used throughout the replica, but the designer ran into a problem when he needed to create a wireless helmet, so it would be easy to take on and off. There’s even a video of the suit in action.

Wireless Controlled Hand
Gabry built this for his final high school project. It consists of XBee and an Arduino Lilypad. The user puts on a glove and as they move their hand another robotic hand mimics the motion of the user.

Do you have an XBee project you would like featured in the XBee Project Gallery? You can submit your own or someone else’s project here.

The Pool Makes Headlines Around the World

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The Pool, built by Jen Lewin, is an interactive light sculpture connected with XBee. It’s been a busy year for Jen as she’s been touring around the world sharing The Pool everywhere from Singapore, to Australia to Burning Man. Here are a few recent articles and videos that detail the travels of one of our favorite XBee projects.

[Video] Jen Lewin: Artist dazzles with light and sound installations | BBC

An Exclusive First Look at the Other-Worldly Art of Burning Man 2014 | Huffington Post

Festival of Lights Illuminates Downtown Cleveland | Design Boom

Sustainable Art Glows Bright in Singapore | NBC News

You can learn more about The Pool in the XBee Gallery. Check out Jen Lewin’s website and like her on Facebook to get more information on what she’s working on. Maybe you’ve been lucky enough to see The Pool first-hand? Share your photos with us at @XBeeWireless.

Mass Transit Demos and More at Arrow IoT Immersions

Digi will be at all four stops of Arrow’s IoT Immersions event. We’ll be traveling to Atlanta, Minneapolis, San Jose, and Boston over the coming months along with other leading tech companies sharing IoT technology and how it’s changing industries. At the show we’ll have three IoT demos to share with you. Here’s a little bit of information on what we’ll be up to during the event and where you can find us:

Mass Transit Bus with ConnectCore 6Digi at Arrow IoT Immersions
We’re extremely excited to be a part of the Mass Transit demo, which showcases how IoT tech is already changing our transit systems. Inside the bus, you will find a Digi ConnectCore 6. The ConnectCore 6, based on the Freescale i.MX6 processor, drives multiple high definition monitors that provide bus location data as well as vehicle diagnostic information to the driver. Other companies that will be on board this mass transit demo include: Intel, Microsoft, Advantech, Microchip, Eurotech.

If one connected transit demo isn’t enough, we have good news. We’ll also be showing off Digi’s Wireless Vehicle Adapter, aka WVA. This handy device opens up a local Wi-Fi network and streams real-time vehicle diagnostic information to a tablet. Stop by our kiosk in the Cloud Pavilion to give it a try. We’ll have a tablet loaded with an Android application for you to play with.

Connected Health Care
We’ll also be sharing how Internet of Things is changing healthcare. There’s an enormous opportunity to use internet connected devices to improve outpatient care. We’ve built a connected blood pressure cuff, which enables caregivers to provide excellent service to patients even if they are outside the hospital.

The blood pressure device was modified with XBee, which enables communication to the cloud. Since the device is connected to the internet, caregivers can easily set up alarms so they’re notified whenever an abnormal condition is met. You can try this demo out for yourself in the Medical Pavilion.

More Information for Arrow IoT Immersions
In addition to our demos, Digi CTO, Joel Young, will be a part of the Solutions Sessions alongside other technology experts. Specifically, they’ll be discussing how the Internet of Things is impacting business, specifically cloud computing and connecting from the network’s edge into the enterprise. Want to attend, but not yet registered? Head over to the IoT Immersions page to sign up.