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Future of Healthcare: Life Science Intersecting with the Exponential Increase in Computing Power

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Life science is intersecting with the exponential increase in computing power, and as President and Managing Partner of Google Ventures (GV), Bill Maris sees great opportunities for new technology in the field. Today, Maris addressed a crowd of entrepreneurs and change makers at one of Chicago’s greatest startup and technology hubs, 1871.

Bill MarisAs we see with our customers’ Internet of Things deployments, every sector, from life sciences to retail and transportation, exponential increases in computing capacity open doors for advances that few see coming.

Maris summed up how technology has grown over the last 20 years: “What is 320,000 times better than it was before? Tech.”

As Maris pointed out, today we all have a device in our hands that connects us to the sum of human knowledge. And, the capacity of computer technology is on an exponential curve. In a world where you’re on an exponential curve, everything changes very quickly.

Pulling a page from Slack Founder Stewart Butterfield, Maris shared two photos to make his point. First, he showed a photo of the crowd at the 2008 presidential inauguration. How were people documenting the experience? With cameras— cameras with film. Fast forward to 2012, and how did people document that event? Digitally, with their phones. Each photo shows thousands of people with cameras and phones respectively. The pictures, side-by-side, paint the radical change that happened in less than four short years.

What does this have to do with technological advances in life sciences?

Everything, because the field of life sciences is currently experiencing this exponential curve, as it somewhat has in the past.

In the 1800s, Bloodletting basins were used to collect blood that was taken from a patient to cure or prevent illness and disease. When the basin was full, the patient was thought to be treated. In the 1950s medical professionals used the “iron lung,” a negative pressure ventilator. Today, the negative form of pressure ventilation has been entirely replaced by positive pressure ventilation or biphasic cuirass ventilation.Then, in 1957, the first chemical synthesis of penicillin was completed.

Today, exponential curves are steeper than ever. The Human Genome Project is a great example. In 2002, people thought it was impossible to sequence the genome to 100%. Here’s how the evolution looked: 1990: 0%; 2002: 1%; 2003: 100%.

So, what does the world look like in 2034? “Think about those exponential curves, and apply that math. This could mean diagnoses before you know you’re sick. You don’t change the oil in the car only when the car breaks down,” Maris said.

A major theme of Maris’ talk about the future warned that we should also look to make sure that technology is distributed and that its creators and adopters consider access. In our work, we’ve seen companies use technology as a means of creating access— a project by Orange Business Services and Almerys, Cardiauvergne, being a great example.   

In today’s world of exponential curves, what’s your business doing to ensure your evolution? How are you using computing power to impact patient and customer outcomes and revenue? We saw Maris’ talk as an invitation to beg the question. We’d love to hear about your innovations in the comments section below.

More on the innovations of Digi customers around the globe.

Bill Maris founded Google Ventures in 2009 and oversees all of the fund’s global activities. GV is one of the most active investors in the world, with approximately $1.6 billion under management, more than 250 portfolio companies and offices in Mountain View, San Francisco, Boston, New York, and London. The fund’s early track record includes investments in pioneers like Uber, Nest, DocuSign, and Cloudera; IPOs like Foundation Medicine and RetailMeNot; and exits to industry leaders like Facebook, Twitter, and Yahoo.

Photo credit: Hyde Park Angels

Digi Visits Munich for Electronica 2014

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Last week Digi attended electronica 2014 in Munich, Germany– and it was a busy one. We unveiled the brand new XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit as well as our global distribution agreement with Mouser.  The event was a great opportunity to connect with some of the top minds in the industry as well as our partners and customers from around the globe.

We also shared three brand new demos!

One uses the ConnectCore 6 SBC to drive multiple high-definition displays. The other two demos feature XBee connected to the cloud. We built a street lighting demo to show how cities are using XBee and cloud control to make street lighting more energy efficient. Also on hand was an example cloud-based application built with the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit and the sensors on the kit’s development board.

All of our demos from the show and more can be seen in the pictures below.

 

As always, check out Digi events page for more info about which events you can find Digi at in the coming months. To learn more about the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit, click here.

Let Your Imagination Run Wireless with the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit: Your Idea Deserves a Prototype

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Automated homes, drones, interactive art installations– XBee can be found nearly anywhere. And, more and more devices are using XBee to connect to the cloud. Connecting a device to the Internet should be simple, that’s why we built the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit. XBee_Dev_Board_w_XBeeWith an XBee ZB module and an XBee Gateway, it’s easy to connect your robot, vehicle, sensors, or anything else to the Internet.

Maybe you want to build a mesh network to monitor the health of your garden or perhaps, you have a top secret idea for your business, but you’re unsure where to start. Here are a few examples to help familiarize yourself with the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit and go from idea to prototype and transform your imagination into reality:

3 Simple XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit Examples

Potentiometer
Potentiometer’s are ubiquitous when it comes to building with electronics and they make great starting point when familiarizing yourself with new technology. Here, we’ll connect this analog input to the cloud, so you can view the values on your Heroku-hosted dashboard. Potentiometers can be used for setting a level, determining an angle or just as a simple user interface adjustment. Nicknamed “pots,” these components are variable resistors. With a simple twist you can alter the amount of voltage that flows out through their center pin.

Push Button
Want to control the light in your room from where you’re sitting? If you answered yes, this example is a great place to start with the XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit. Remote control of a button is perfect for projects that require user input, or anyplace you need to detect a change in device state. One you’ve built your circuit, you’ll be able to view the status of the button and control it from your web interface.photo (17)

Temperature 
Temperature monitoring is another great starting point with analog sensing. In this example we use everyone’s favorite temperature sensor, the TMP36 low-voltage linear sensor, which is included with your kit. After you’ve built this simple circuit, you can view the temperature on the dashboard.

Let’s Get Started
These are just a few ideas to get you thinking about what is possible with this new XBee kit. You can find all of these examples and more here, and check out the XBee Gallery to find what others have built with XBee.

Interested in getting an XBee ZigBee Cloud Kit? Head over here.

Security Vulnerability – POODLE – CVE-2014-3566

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Overview

In the last few weeks, We have had a number of questions regarding the new vulnerability nicknamed “POODLE” CVE-2014-3566.”  As for every vulnerability, we review each one carefully to determine the impact to our devices and services, and we try to make a recommendation to our customers on the anticipated impact of these vulnerabilities. In these last weeks, we have conducted a risk analysis of this new vulnerability, as well as we are testing all of our devices for this vulnerability. Since this new vulnerability is coming down on the heels of HeartBleed and Shellshock, I am anticipating that many people will be covering this new vulnerability.

Analysis13334048894_001d3e53d1_z

In our testing, we have found that many of our devices are impacted. This is in part because of the backward compatibility that we have built within our products. However, we have determined that very few customers are using these features, and we are actively removing the SSLv3 support for new firmware versions going forward. We have already fixed this issue in a number of devices, and we are in the middle of releasing new versions of firmware with this issue fixed.

Impact

As for every vulnerability, we review each one carefully to determine the impact to our devices and services, and we try to make a recommendation to our customers on the anticipated impact of these vulnerabilities. However, since we do not know each specific configuration and data that our customers are using for our products and services, it is always suggested that the customer review their unique situation and understand what the risk could be to their environment. However, we have found that with our products, that we rate this a “very low” impact.

Notice

Please check the official Digi and Etherios corporate response to poodle at http://www.digi.com/support/kbase/kbaseresultdetl?id=3619

 

As always, if you have any questions, feel free to email cloud.security@etherios.com, or security@digi.com

Mass Transit Demos and More at Arrow IoT Immersions

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Digi will be at all four stops of Arrow’s IoT Immersions event. We’ll be traveling to Atlanta, Minneapolis, San Jose, and Boston over the coming months along with other leading tech companies sharing IoT technology and how it’s changing industries. At the show we’ll have three IoT demos to share with you. Here’s a little bit of information on what we’ll be up to during the event and where you can find us:

Mass Transit Bus with ConnectCore 6Digi at Arrow IoT Immersions
We’re extremely excited to be a part of the Mass Transit demo, which showcases how IoT tech is already changing our transit systems. Inside the bus, you will find a Digi ConnectCore 6. The ConnectCore 6, based on the Freescale i.MX6 processor, drives multiple high definition monitors that provide bus location data as well as vehicle diagnostic information to the driver. Other companies that will be on board this mass transit demo include: Intel, Microsoft, Advantech, Microchip, Eurotech.

If one connected transit demo isn’t enough, we have good news. We’ll also be showing off Digi’s Wireless Vehicle Adapter, aka WVA. This handy device opens up a local Wi-Fi network and streams real-time vehicle diagnostic information to a tablet. Stop by our kiosk in the Cloud Pavilion to give it a try. We’ll have a tablet loaded with an Android application for you to play with.

Connected Health Care
We’ll also be sharing how Internet of Things is changing healthcare. There’s an enormous opportunity to use internet connected devices to improve outpatient care. We’ve built a connected blood pressure cuff, which enables caregivers to provide excellent service to patients even if they are outside the hospital.

The blood pressure device was modified with XBee, which enables communication to the cloud. Since the device is connected to the internet, caregivers can easily set up alarms so they’re notified whenever an abnormal condition is met. You can try this demo out for yourself in the Medical Pavilion.

More Information for Arrow IoT Immersions
In addition to our demos, Digi CTO, Joel Young, will be a part of the Solutions Sessions alongside other technology experts. Specifically, they’ll be discussing how the Internet of Things is impacting business, specifically cloud computing and connecting from the network’s edge into the enterprise. Want to attend, but not yet registered? Head over to the IoT Immersions page to sign up.

A Simpler and More Intelligent Internet of Things with Digi and Temboo

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The ongoing drought in the western United States underscores the importance of maintaining and conserving a reliable supply of fresh water—whether for drinking, irrigation, fire control or manufacturing, reliable water storage is essential. Of course, half the battle in maintaining a water supply is managing it: once a tank system has been installed and filled, water must be properly distributed when it is needed and retained when it is not. If tanks are remote and many are spread over a wide area, monitoring them can become a costly and time-consuming obligation.

Screen Shot 2014-09-04 at 12.03.09 PMThese are the sorts of challenges that Digi and Temboo are overcoming by building a more intelligent Internet of Things. A network of Digi hardware running Temboo Choreos is flexible and smart—devices can be programmed to execute a wide variety of processes, and be reprogrammed without being interrupted. This is a solution that combines ease of automation with the trustworthiness of manual control. To illustrate the solution’s benefits, and demonstrate how the whole system works, we’ve built a model of the water tank problem. This system puts Temboo and Digi to work, keeping water levels right where they ought to be.

Our tank monitoring solution uses an XBee ZigBee radio to wirelessly exchange sensor information and remote control commands using Digi’s new XBee Gateway, a programmable device that joins ZigBee mesh networks to the Internet. A small Temboo client written in Python is installed on the XBee Gateway, allowing it to connect to over one hundred different web services using Temboo Choreos. With Temboo, the memory constraints of the small devices in the network cease to be an obstacle to intelligent behavior, as much of the code required to execute complex processes is offloaded to the cloud.

In our model, a sensor attached to the XBee radio monitors the water level of our tank, and sends those readings to the XBee Gateway. If the tank leaks and the water level falls, a response is triggered on the gateway. First, the gateway uses Temboo’s Yahoo Weather Choreos to check the forecast for rain. Temboo’s Nexmo Choreos are then used to telephone the relevant individual with an automated voice message that gives a real time rain forecast and offers a choice of actions to take by entering a number on the phone’s keypad.

Screen Shot 2014-09-04 at 11.56.33 AMIf a storm is on its way, there is an option to ignore the alert. If the leakage does not need to be urgently addressed, there is an option to schedule a maintenance event for the future, which the Temboo program on the gateway handles via a Google Calendar Choreo . If the situation is urgent, however, there is another option to activate a backup pump at a different point in the XBee network and refill the tank.  Of course, all of this will only work properly if the sensor and gateway are powered on and functioning, so our system needs to be prepared for any loss of connectivity—if, for any reason, transmission of the level of water in the tank stops, another Temboo Choreo will file a Zendesk ticket to alert support that the system needs attention.

The most exciting thing about this model, however, is that it is only a small example of a massively scalable system. XBee technology can connect hundreds of different devices in a much larger network, and Temboo’s Library contains over two thousand other Choreos that can be used to execute an immense variety of tasks. Modifying the behavior of the Temboo program on the gateway to, for example, switch notification services is just a matter of changing Choreos, a simple task.  Digi’s hardware and Temboo’s software are coming together to build a lighter, smarter and much easier to use Internet of Things.

Demo created using:

Are you using Temboo or XBee in your Internet of Things application? You can share how you’re using wireless technology by tweeting us at @XBeeWireless and @Temboo.

Bar Graphs, Security Systems, and GPS… All with XBee!

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Here are a few more wireless projects you can build with some sensors, Arduino and XBee. Below are project descriptions and links to instructions that will walk you through each step, including example code. Feel free to get creative and put your own spin on these projects!

Wireless Bar Graph Display
Want to monitor the level of light in a room and reflect that data with a shiny LED bar graph? Then check out  this project, which uses an MBed microcontroller, light sensor, LED bar graph, and a pair of XBee radios to get you going on monitoring brightness without even being there. Complete instructions here.

Security Monitor
Let’s build a comprehensive security system! The motion sensor detects when a person passes by and alerts you by displaying a warning on an LCD screen and you can even be alerted with an audio message. For this project, you’ll need an Arduino and XBee radio. After all, Arduino and XBee are best friends in the electrical engineering world! Why else would an XBee shield exist? Complete instructions here.

Device Cloud GPS
Want to track the GPS coordinates of the RC vehicle you’re working on? Well, it’s simple with an XBee gateway, Arduino and Device Cloud. Complete instructions here.

Check out examples.digi.com for more projects. There, you can browse tutorials for beginner, intermediate, and even experienced XBee developers. Once you’re done building, feel free to share them with us on TwitterFacebook, or Google+ using the #XBee hashtag. Happy building!

Employee Hackathon at Digi Wireless Design Services

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At Digi we are constantly looking for ways to stretch our imagination and find new and creative applications for the technology we work with every day. This was the first hackathon held at our Wireless Design Services office, so we were excited to see what our talented hardware engineers could dream up. Here’s what the teams created in just a few days.IMG_0138

Pet Management System

As pet owners, we all want to treat our four-legged friends well. The pet management system does just that. Gone is the guilt of being away from home for an entire day, because now your furry companions can feed themselves.

There are two elements to the pet management system. The first being a self serving dog food bowl (note: this system can be adapted for cats, we like them too). The other component is detection of animals when they are on the furniture.

The feeding system gives your pet the ability to dispense food into their dish all on their own. They just need to place their paw on a pad on the ground. This activates a motor that delivers food to the bowl. The schematic below will you give you an idea of how it all works.PetSchematic

The detection system will alert the owner whenever the pet hops up on the couch. An infrared sensor detects when your pet is up on the couch and you can choose to receive alerts via email or SMS. The sensor is connected to a microcontroller, which is sends data to Device Cloud via XBee.

Also, the data is streamed in real-time into a web-based dashboard. This live feed captures activity from both of the sensors involved in the pet management system.

ActiveID

The Active ID project is made to simplify the exchange of information between two people. Whether it be at a trade show or a social gathering after work, the Active IDs eliminate the need for barcode scanners and computers in order to gather someone’s information. IMG_0143

How does it work? Bluetooth low energy modules in each tag notice each other and use the criteria entered by the user to determine compatibility. If the badge finds a compatible match, the tag will light up or play a sound to notify the user of the matching profile.  If the people that are matched up want to exchange information, they each press the connect button and they will each receive an email with each other’s information via Device Cloud.

Software Defined Radio

Software defined radio allows you to decode RF signals across a large frequency band with one device. Traditionally, wireless signals are decoded with proprietary hardware that can only readIMG_0147 a very narrow band, like a Wi-Fi module for example. With the lowering cost of high performance CPUs/MCUs, the decoding of RF can be done through software rather than hardware.

Dustin and Mike put together their own software defined radio using an i.MX28 for processing and an ultra-wide band antenna, which was built from scratch.

The project was based on this open source software library for SDR. Mike implemented changes to decode a group of environmental sensors (humidity, temperature, anemometer, and rain level) that operate at 433 MHz. The software decoder was also linked up to the Cloud Connector, so the platform can send data up to Device Cloud.

Closing

Like we mentioned earlier, this was our first hackathon at Wireless Design Services, and it was great to see what our WDS team was able to create in just a short amount of time. Hackathons are always a fun way for us to test the usability of our products and build projects we might otherwise never get to. Hopefully these will serve as a source of inspiration as you build your own Internet of Things projects!